What is the advantage of animal sniffer over using a boot class path?

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What is the advantage of animal sniffer over using a boot class path?

russgold
I am in the process of converting a ridiculously complicated ant build (well over 200 build files) to maven. One feature of the existing build is that it checks for use of unsupported JDKs by compiling with a specific boot class path. It is my understanding that the accepted Maven way to do that is via use of the animal sniffer maven plugin, but I note that using that plugin adds a noticeable amount of time to the build (for this step with over 5000 classes, it is taking close to a minute). 

It leads to me to wonder if I shouldn't switch back to using the boot class path. What arguments are there, pro and con, for the plugin approach?

Thanks,
Russ
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Come read my webnovel, Take a Lemon <http://www.takealemon.com>, 
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Re: What is the advantage of animal sniffer over using a boot class path?

Stephen Connolly-2


On Tuesday, 30 July 2013, Russell Gold wrote:
I am in the process of converting a ridiculously complicated ant build (well over 200 build files) to maven. One feature of the existing build is that it checks for use of unsupported JDKs by compiling with a specific boot class path. It is my understanding that the accepted Maven way to do that is via use of the animal sniffer maven plugin, but I note that using that plugin adds a noticeable amount of time to the build (for this step with over 5000 classes, it is taking close to a minute). 

It leads to me to wonder if I shouldn't switch back to using the boot class path. What arguments are there, pro and con, for the plugin approach?

Animal-sniffer means you have a very portable build. The expense is a longer build time... You can put it in a profile and only activate on the CI server if it gets in the way of developers.

Boot classpath means you have to have the required classpath at the defined location on all machines that do the build. If somebody puts the wrong JDK at the boot classpath fixed path, you won't know the issue as its not obvious. 


Thanks,
Russ
-----------------
Come read my webnovel, Take a Lemon <http://www.takealemon.com>, 
and listen to the Misfile radio play <http://www.fuzzyfacetheater.com/misfile/>!







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